Highway systems in Maryland and Virginia rank in the bottom half nationally in terms of their cost-effectiveness and performance, according to a new report from a libertarian think tank.

The 23rd Annual Highway Report from the Reason Foundation said both states suffered from too much congestion in urban areas, though both states received good marks for road safety. Maryland got poor marks for the amount spent on maintenance and administration of its highways, while Virginia was criticized for the narrowness of its rural roads.

The report ranked states in 11 categories and gave an overall ranking. Maryland ranked 40th overall, with Virginia ranking 27.

Here’s a breakdown of each state:

Virginia (27th overall)

-Ranked 7th in total highway disbursements, with $71,829 spent per state-controlled mile.

-Rated 49th overall in the number of rural roads considered to be too narrow. The report said nearly 48 percent of rural roads fit this category.

-Ranked 42nd in urban road congestion.

-Ranked 10th in highway fatality rate, with a 0.9 percent fatality rate per 100 million vehicle miles.

Maryland (40th overall)

-Ranked 47th in highway disbursements, with $578,995 spent per state-controlled highway mile.

-Rated 39th in urban road congestion and 41st in urban interstate pavement condition.

-Has fewer narrow rural roads that most states. Maryland ranked 17th in this category, with just 1.71% of roads considered too narrow.

-Ranked 9th in highway fatalities, with a 0.89 percent fatality rate per 100 million vehicle miles.


Read:

Click here to sign up for commuter news and real-time traffic updates for free, delivered to your inbox Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.